Category Archives: Research and Academia

Minor updated to Kanban View for Cultured Code Things 3

First, Kansan-View scripts and css are now available on GitHub. 

Second, many thanks to Alexander Willner from Berlin, Germany for making the script fully compatible with both the stock 2.7 (coming with any recent macOS version) and 3.6 version of python. Furthermore, he introduce dynamic home folder as well as default output in the same directory as the script path. This removes the need of previous version to edit the script to change the unix user name in the file path. As such, the new version is extremely easy to run . Better, follow the instruction (method 2) given here and make it a system service, assign a keyboard shortcut and never, ever run python directly yourself!

Kanban-View for Things 3 – Release V1.0 available (free)!

Synopsis:

The following will allow a visual project-level overview of what is on your plate. It is comprised of 3 files: a python script, a CSS file and a PDF README file (a copy of this post). It can be executed from the terminal or as a system service using the macOS Automator app (thus never needing to open a terminal and can be associated to a keyboard short cut).

*** read below for the download link ***

Read the rest of this entry

A Kanban view for Things 3 : Part III – displaying the project-level information

Almost there!

Quite surprisingly, I hadn’t written html code since I completed my PhD in 1996. From 1993 to 1996, I created and maintained our research group webpage. At the time, we were one of the few to actually have sites. Well, it does come back and boy it much easier than anticipated (at least at the current level)  😉

Read the rest of this entry

Adding an efficient, higher-level project view layer to Things 3: a proposal

Task manager applications are great. They help you get things out of your head and easily accessible. One of the major issues with task manager applications is higher level planning, particularly on the fly decision about committing or not a new project. This is because you need in one look an overview of everything going one right now, including deadlines. This is something not easy to do only with a Task Manager and your electronic calendar apps. Also for what I am thinking about, a planning software is not that useful either. I tried OmniPlan for that purpose alone, maintenance is higher than I would like and I am still not convinced this is the best way of doing it.

Read the rest of this entry

Free, multi-platform pro-like applications for students

Free software is software that gives you the user the freedom to share, study and modify it. We call this free software because the user is free

– Free Software Foundation

 

Going through graduate studies (or even undergraduate studies), is about creativity, hard work and learning not to loose information, not to drop the ball on ideas and projects. In order word, part of it is also about being able to put your ideas to work for you in an efficient manner. In the following are a few applications to help you along the way. Of course, nothing precludes the good old pen and paper. I personally really enjoy my Lamy 2000 fountain pen and a Leuchtturm 1917 whitelines notebook (but this is for another post!).

Read the rest of this entry

Université Laval medical physics professors and students in action at AAPM2017

This week, our students and faculty are involved in 17 presentations at the AAPM meeting in Denver, Colorado. This include Best In Physics (Therapy) Marie-Ève Delage. Overall 2 general poster presentations, 5 poster discussions (ePoster), 3 SNAP Oral, 5 oral presentations and two symposium presentations.

Read the rest of this entry

New manuscript published by our group!

Use of 3D- transabdominal Ultrasound Imaging for Treatment Planning in Cervical Cancer Brachytherapy: Comparison to Magnetic Resonance and Computed Tomography available for 50 days (free) – https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1VS4n5Tpjq36rD.

 

 

A new list of predatory (blacklist) journals is available…for a fee

Beall’s list of predatory journals has found a “commercial” replacement. Let’s see how much it will cost to access.

Source: U.S. company launches a new blacklist of deceptive academic journals | University Affairs

Naylor Report on Fundamental Science in Canada released!

Report home can be found here: Canada’s Fundamental Science Review. The download link for the report itself is prominently displayed.

We have received 439 000$ from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation JR Evans Leader Funds Program

“Luc Beaulieu, du même département, disposera de près de 440 000$ pour réaliser son projet Development of Novel Optic-based Dose Sensors and Dose-based Treatment Guidance. ”

Source: 17 projets financés par le Fonds des leaders – Journal Le Fil

 

Money to acquire new state-of-the-art equipment. Will expand our research program and enable new graduate student projects.

 

Exciting!

New publication by our group on Quantum Dots as radiation nano-dosimeters.

Systematic characterization of semiconductor colloidal quantum dots (cQDs) response to ionizing radiation must be performed to use them in radiation detection. In this study, the robustness of multi-shell (MS) and core/shell (CS) cQDs was investigated under irradiation. Radioluminescence (RL) measurements with kV and MV photon beams revealed a better resistance of MS cQDs to ionizing radiation, with their spectra fluctuating by barely ∼ 1 nm. A systematic signal recovery between subsequent irradiations was noticed for MS cQDs only. A beam energy dependence of the RL stability was detected between kV and MV energies. At the same point of dose cumulated, the RL signal loss for the kV beams was observed to be ∼6-7% smaller than that of the MV beam, for both types of cQDs. These results demonstrate that MS cQDs are better candidates as ionizing radiation sensors than CS cQDs, especially in the kV energy range.

Source: Robust shell passivation of CdSe colloidal quantum dots to stabilize radioluminescence emission

Scintillation dosimetry review manuscript is now out!

Long time coming but totally worth it 😉

Source: Review of plastic and liquid scintillation dosimetry for photon, electron, and proton therapy – IOPscience

PLOS ONE: How Many Is Too Many? On the Relationship between Research Productivity and Impact

Clearly if you do not published, you can never be cited…However, interesting to see that the Natural sciences field seems to taper-off more quickly than the life science field.

 

Source: PLOS ONE: How Many Is Too Many? On the Relationship between Research Productivity and Impact

Luc Beaulieu on brachytherapy research!

Here is a BrachyTalk interview I gave during the 2016 ESTRO meeting in Torino,  Italy. Get to know what I am working on and my (physics and biomedical technology) vision of the field.

Thanks to the peoples at BrachyAcademy for making me look good during that interview 😉

How much time does it really take?

To present a scientific subject in an attractive and stimulating manner is an artistic task, similar to that of a novelist or even a dramatic writer. The same holds for writing textbooks.
– Max Born

When a graduate student come to me with the big news that its abstract has been selected for an oral presentation, my first reaction is a big congratulations and the second is to already set a deadline for a first version of the talk. Because of the abstract, you already know the content, what needs to be presented. But crafting an effective 7, 8 or 10 minutes presentation is a complete new game.
Read the rest of this entry

%d bloggers like this: